I’ve been reading and researching for my project, most recently about David Hawkins and things related. Last night I stumbled upon a blog by one of his friends and colleagues, John Paull, who began his connection with David Hawkins when John Paull was working in the Leicestershire schools in the UK and David Hawkins came to the UK to learn about the work happening there in the Infant Schools, as part of his work with ESS, the Elementary Science Study.

Here is the post:

http://mywishingrock.blogspot.com/2013/02/david-hawkins-his-100th-birthday.html

The blog post was a tribute to David Hawkins on what would have been his 100th birthday. There is a wonderful chronology of Hawkins’ life and work, and a proposal for a school John Paull had helped design in honor of David Hawkins which he and a group hoped to establish in Denver. The proposal was denied, but I found it to be an interesting read, somewhat similar in form and philosophy to the Somerville Progressive Charter School proposal I helped develop, which we just recently had to abandon due to changes in the state regulation of Charter schools..

In any case, John Paull referred to his classrooms as “richly resourced”, I believe, and there were many references to hands on learning, Open Studios, inquiry based science, reading and writing workshops, reflective meetings at the end of each day, and learning math and reading and writing as tools for learning, rather than as ends in themselves.

I met with a friend for lunch yesterday to talk about ideas related to my project, which doesn’t have a core just yet, and was online researching after our conversation to follow up on ideas we discussed. One of them is the importance of materials and children having time to explore them and to follow their own ideas.

Today in the day care, I was especially aware of how much of children’s activity in our program is based on relating to the physical world. We have a project room full of all kinds of art and science materials which we used today to work with play dough at one table, and stamps and stickers at the other. There are puzzles in four rooms, building toys in three, dress ups and dolls and dishes and other dramatic play props in three rooms, cooking supplies in the kitchen, vehicles and figures in two rooms, a cd player and cds and musical instruments in one room, and today a young guy brought a hand held MP3 player he could use independently, playing music during our art project and while waiting for other kids to dress. At the park, we have sand and ice, shovels and buckets and other sand toys, and all sorts of natural materials, from sticks to pinecones to leaves and rocks, which the kids use for play and projects of their own design. There are riding toys, trees and bushes and climbers and slides, a playhouse and other equipment.

I cannot imagine asking our kids to sit at tables and spend their days with pencil and paper. Why, I keep wondering, do we expect that in any school, all the way up through college? My own kids spend a good part of their day at school interacting with materials, whether playing sports outside, sliding on the ice or sledding in the snow, drawing or painting or working with clay in the art room, playing music and singing in the music rooms or piano room, or playing games with friends. Other kids there use blocks, dress-ups, sewing materials, and cook. There is a pool table and outside there are endless natural materials for play and building as well as swings, a slide, a sand pit, a basketball court, a bike shed full of bikes, rocks and trees for climbing, hills and woods to explore. Many kids bring materials from home, whether toys or art supplies or games or computers, to add to what is already at school.

The world is so much more than pencil and paper and books and writing. Part of what the project I want to do has to do with the importance of materials. Not sure yet how all the parts relate, but that will be in there..David Hawkins set up spaces full of materials, some natural, some manufactured, some designed by him and his colleagues for adults and children to explore, then engaged with materials and the children adults in learning about all kinds of things, from ponds to pendulums to patterns. I’d like to learn more about how he viewed the role of materials and how he viewed the role of the adults and children. In Reggio Emilia, an early childhood approach about which he was curious and which he influenced, the environment is considered the third thing, after the child and the teacher, necessary in any learning environment, and considered carefully by those creating learning and care situations for children.

This morning I tidied an art cupboard, organized the paper supplies. Last week I sorted the construction and painting materials. The week before that I tidied and reorganized dishes on the kitchen shelf. Little by little, I’m attending to the materials in the space and hopping that just in the handling and organizing of them, I’ll get reconnected to their importance and potential in the life of children.

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